(303)652-0130 enrollment@bvwaldorf.org

Innovative Curriculum

When our students graduate from Boulder Valley Waldorf School they “know” themselves and choose tailored higher education and career paths. Success for BVWS graduates includes:

  • leadership roles (our students have high emotional intelligences)
  • entrepreneurship (our students are creative thinkers with a strong work ethic)
  • college graduates in diverse subjects (our students have a life-long love of learning)
  • professionals (our students are flexible thinkers and creative problem-solvers)
  • parents and educators (our students are contributing community-minded individuals)

The chief technology officer of eBay sends his children to a [Waldorf school]. So do employees of Silicon Valley giants like Google, Apple, Yahoo and Hewlett-Packard. But the school’s chief teaching tools are anything but high-tech: pens and paper, knitting needles and, occasionally, mud. Not a computer to be found. No screens at all…  A New York Times story published in 2011 called “A Silicon Valley School that Doesn’t Compute” demonstrates how creative thinking, movement, human interaction and attention spans are best served this way.                                     Program Overview

“My Waldorf background really helped for doing research. Research, at least in my experience, is very creative.”

Daryl Goldman

After graduating from Shepherd Valley (now Boulder Valley Waldorf School), Daryl Goldman studied in the undergraduate biochemistry program at the University of Rochester in New York, which she completed at CU in Boulder. During college, she did a significant amount of research in a biochemistry genetics lab, researching cancer and various metabolic diseases. Now, Daryl is in her second year at The University of Queensland Ochsner Clinical School, in Australia. Her medical program will finish with two years in New Orleans, at which point she will be a doctor.

Daryl says, “My Waldorf background really helped for doing research. Research, at least in my experience, is very creative. “Waldorf has helped in learning how to think and how to work independently. In college, at the beginning there was a little bit of catch-up in some of the basic science courses. But once I got past the basics, I really felt I had a leg up in the way that I thought, the way I interacted with my professors, the way I went about learning–in these areas, I was far more advanced than my peers.

“As long as you know how to work and how to learn, you can learn anything. One day when I have kids, I definitely want to send them to Waldorf school, because they can go into anything from there.”

As I have traveled and started a business, I have been amazed at the depth and breadth of knowledge that serves as a foundation, coming from my years of Waldorf education.

Neal Ritter

Describing himself as “a lifelong Waldorf student”, Neal Ritter graduated from Shepherd Valley (now Boulder Valley) in 2001. He attended Tara Performing Arts High School, then spent several years traveling to 26 countries on several continents.

In 2007, Neal co-founded the Laughing Coyote Project, a non-profit dedicated to teaching Earth Skills, and has been playing games, telling stories and immersing himself in the ancestral skills ever since.

Neal says, “The multi-faceted Waldorf education is a gem. As I have traveled and started a business, I have been amazed at the depth and breadth of knowledge that serves as a foundation, coming from my years of Waldorf education. Of particular value are mythology, history, foreign language, and the crafts.

An education that gives students the ability to solve issues from multiple angles, engaging their imagination, creativity as well as logical thinking should be treasured.”